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Kaylani

cEDH Handbook - Game Scenarios

Here are some examples of decisions made during real matches

*TABLE OF CONTENTS* [link](https://cardsrealm.com/articles/607)(1. Threat Assessment) 2. Game Scenarios 3. Archetypes *GAME SCENARIOS* This time, we will exemplify the principles discussed in the previous article with decisions made during actual matches. • *1st scenario* [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/uploads/1579221467.jpeg) - *Player A* had a slow *development* and was trying to gradually create *board presence* due to decks with mass removals in the match. - *Player B* spent the first few rounds managing their hand, trying to gather 7 mana necessary to their win condition while controlling the pace of the other decks. - *Player C* tried to gather *card advantage* in the early game using his commanders. He also used *tutors* to search for answers and missing pieces for his combo. - *Player D* quickly achieved 12 mana with his [card](Dockside Extortionist) and was ready to engage in the next turn. *Board state:*          A: Some *mana dorks*, the commander and 1 mana.          B: Commander, some artifacts and 0 mana.          C: Mana dorks, [card](Jace, Wielder of Mysteries) (Lab-Jace), commanders and 6 mana.          D: [card](Dockside Extornionist) and 12 mana. In the 5th turn, *Player B* put a piece of his combo at the top of his library with [card](Mystical Tutor). He used this instant on his own turn because the other players didn't have much mana, although *Player C* had a [card](Jace, Wielder of Mysteries) (Lab-Jace) on the battlefield. *Player C* then used his Jace, forcing *Player B* to cast a draw spell at *instant speed* so as not to lose his combo piece. In response, *Player C* used [card](Vampiric Tutor) to put a piece of his [card](Protean Hulk) combo on the top of his library and draw it with Jace. *Player C* ended his turn with [card](Jace, Wielder of Mysteries), [card](Sylvan Safekeeper) and 6 mana. On *Player D*'s turn (while *Player B* had no mana), he cast [card](Obliterate), sacrificing his Treasure tokens in order to gather enough mana to play his commander. With the mana generated, *Player C* cast [card](Flash) before switching phases and then *wins the match.* - *Analysis:* *Player B* used a tutor to gather his combo piece even though he knew he would need resources to defend it. He also tried to execute his game plan *without taking into account his opponents' capabilities*, probably because he didn't know much about his decks. *Player D* lost the game because he *didn't recognize imminent threats* from other decks, probably due to a lack of knowledge about the format. He also failed in changing his *game plan* in the presence of said threats. • *2nd scenario* [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/uploads/1579222546.jpeg) - *Player A* had a quick development with the help of *mana rocks* and slowed *Player C* (which was the fastest deck) with the help of disruptive elements from the other players. - *Player B* had a slower development and could not commit to the development of his *board* due to the threat of [card](Flash) + [card](Protean Hulk) that *Player C* presented. - *Player C* had a good development with the use of mana dorks and was using the commander to obtain *card advantage* until he was delayed by a *board wipe*. - *Player D* didn't have permanents that affected the game until his commander was on the field, except for a [card](Howling Mine) that was destroyed by *Player A* (who didn't want others drawing more cards). *Board state:*          A: Some mana rocks, [card](Karn, the Great Creator), [card](Teferi, Time Raveler) and 12 mana.          B: Commander and 6 mana.          C: [card](Thrasios, Triton Hero), [card](Noble Hierarch), [card](Sylvan Safekeeper) and 6 mana. On his hand, he had a [card](Jace, Wielder of Mysteries) (Lab-Jace), [card](Demonic Consultation) and [card](Veil of Summer).          D: were using a deck with few interactions and so his board and hand did not effectively affect the game. *Player A* managed to lead the game with the ability to play at *instant speed* and due to the acceleration he achieved in the *early game*, on top of using an off-meta deck, which was mistakenly ignored. With [card](Teferi, Time Raveler) preventing other players from finding answers and the ability to develop his board even further on *Player D's* end-step, it was clear that the game needed to be resolved quickly. *Player B's* hand consisted only of a bounce spell, which would not be effective against *Player A's* [card](Raff Capashen, Ship's Mage), as he could recast his permanents. In the end, *Player B* spent the turn expecting the worst. *Player C* needed [card](Veil of Summer)'s protection to execute his game plan, but *Player A's* [card](Teferi, Time Raveler) wouldn't let them cast it. So, *Player C* tried to force *Player A's* interaction by attacking Teferi with two creatures. *Player A* blocked one of the creatures but had to cast [card](Teferi's Protection) so as not to lose Teferi. With *Player A* out of the picture, *Player C* cast [card](Jace, Wielder of Mysteries) and [card](Demonic Consultation). However, *Player B* had two removals, and so [card](Veil of Summer) was not the enough to protect Jace. On *Player A's* turn, he cast [card](Knowledge Pool) to lock the other players with Teferi. After a board wipe, the other players *conceded.* - *Analysis:* *Player A* almost lost the game due to a conservative move and *Player B* had to use his responses to stop *Player C*. *Player C* tried to end the game early because he didn't think the situation would get any better (and it didn't). *Player D*, in addition to not interacting with other players' threats, provided an additional draw with [card](Howling Mine). This kind of strategy can backfire, as giving cards to your opponents isn't the best option. In short, many resources in this match were misallocated and key decisions were ignored until they could no longer be resolved. • *3rd scenario* [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/uploads/1579222838.jpeg) - *Player A* and *Player D* both spent the early game trying to use mana dorks to accelerate his strategies, trying to clutch the game quickly with an infinite mana combo, as *Player B* and *Player C* would stabilize during the *late game*. - *Player B* and *Player C*, on the other hand, spent the early game resolving specific threats from *Player A* and *Player D* while trying to *ramp* his mana and gather card advantage. - After some clashes, *Player A* and *Player D* could no longer keep up with the game and so the match would be decided between *Player B* and *Player C*. *Board state:*          A: Some mana dorks and 0 mana.          B: More than 20 mana.          C: Commander, [card](Counterbalance) and more than 10 mana.          D: Mana dorks and 1 mana. *Player B* had access to more than 20 mana per turn (thanks to Urborg-Coffers and Mana Doublers) and was expecting a loophole to win with [card](Exsanguinate). *Player C* was trying to use [card](Rashmi, Eternities Crafter) with [card](Capsize)'s buyback ability so he could draw even more cards. Following some stalemate turns, *Player C* had a [card](Peregrine Drake) + [card](Deadeye Navigator) combo in hand, but waited until he had more cards than *Player B*, so he could answer all his removals. After a few more turns, *Player C* used [card](Gitaxian Probe) to find out if it was possible to outplay *Player B's* removals. However, *Player B* had a [card](Sudden Death) in hand (a removal with *split second*). *Player C* then cast [card](Brainstorm) to put [card](Capsize) on top of the deck, which allowed them to use [card](Counterbalance)'s effect to counter *Player B's* [card](Sudden Death), as both Sudden Death and Capsize had the same converted mana cost. After casting [card](Delay), [card](Dispel) and triggering [card](Counterbalance), *Player C* managed to play his [card](Peregrine Drake) + [card](Deadeye Navigator) combo and *proceed to win* with [card](Stroke of Genius). - *Analysis:* If *Player C* was impatient, he would have lost his only combo and possibly the entire match. However, he identified that it was up to *Player B* to *take initiative* and moved aggressively only after being confident that victory could be obtained. • *4th scenario* [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/uploads/1579223045.jpeg) This match can be found in the 1st episode of the 3rd season of Laboratory Maniacs [1]. - *Player A* had an explosive start with [card](Mana Vault) in his 1st turn, an uncounterable [card](The Gitrog Monster) in his 2nd turn and a [card](Bazaar of Baghdad) shortly after. - *Player B* spent the first few turns developing his board and responding to *Player A's* Gitrog with a [card](Gilded Drake), a solution that was circumvented by *Player A* using his newly purchased [card](Homeward Path). - *Player C* had a slower start and used one of his responses to slow *Player D*, knowing that Zur is also an explosive deck. - *Player D* had one of his acceleration pieces countered but found an opening to try to clutch the game. After a [card](Timetwister) cast by *Player C* and a [card](Chain of Vapor) that cleared much of the field (17:20 in the video [1]), the players used the next cycle to rebuild his boards. After an attempt of a *end step sculpt* by *Player A* and a [card](Vampiric Tutor) cast by *Player D*, we have the following: *Board state:*          A: Commander, [card](Homeward Path) (in the field) and [card](Life from the Loam) (in hand).          B: [card](Gilded Drake), [card](Mystic Remora), [card](Exploration), [card](Carpet of Flowers) and 3 mana.          C: [card](Grim Monolith), [card](Rhystic Study) and 5 mana.          D: [card](Sensei's Divining Top) and 5 mana. *Player D* then cast a [card](Laboratory Maniac) followed by a [card](Demonic Consultation). Although *Player B* has [card](Mystic Remora) and *Player C* has [card](Rhystic Study) (both with enough mana to cast them), *Player D* thought it was a good time to try to win the game. The game was starting to get out of reach for *Player D*, since the other decks had lots of *card advantage*. The result of the interaction (which was admitted as "greedy" by *Player D*) can be seen in the episode. Spoilers, though: *Player D* was stopped by a simple [card](Chain of Vapor). - *Analysis:* The mistake here was not to ignore the other decks at the table, or even not knowing how to assess threats. Rather, *Player D* failed in trying to end the game without having any sort of protection against other players' interactions. • *5th scenario* [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/uploads/1579223244.jpeg) This match can be found in the 2nd episode of the 3rd season of Laboratory Maniacs [2]. - *Player A* cast in his 1st turn a piece of the *Stax* strategy ([card](Grafdigger's Cage)) that affected two other decks. Then, he spent the next turns only presenting answers. - *Player B* cast a mana dork in his 1st turn and [card](Aven Mindcensor) in his 2nd (another Stax piece instead of his commander). - *Player C* was *setback* due to the Aven Mindcensor cast by *Player B*. - *Player D* started very slowly and cast another piece of Stax ([card](Cursed Totem)) in turn 2. *Board state:*          A: [card](Grafdigger's Cage) and 3 (blue) mana.          B: [card](Noble Hierarch), [card](Aven Mindcensor) and 3 mana.          C: [card](Mox Opal) and 1 mana.          D: [card](Cursed Totem), [card](Mox Opal) and 0 mana. *Player B* had his [card](Tymna the Weaver) countered by *Player A* (12:20 in the video [2]). The battlefield contained 3 pieces of Stax, where 2 of them hijacked *Player B's* original plan ([card](Flash) + [card](Protean Hulk)). - *Analysis:* *Player B's* reasoning was to use the commander as a *card advantage engine* while he were unable to remove Stax's pieces. However, *Player A* thought that in a slower game Tymna would lead in *card advantage* and surprised *Player B* with a [card](Counterspell). • *6th scenario* [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/uploads/1579223367.jpeg) This match can be found in the uncut episode of the 3rd season of Laboratory Maniacs [3]. - *Player A* had a quick development, as is usual for a *Food Chain* deck, and spent the first few turns using tutors to gather pieces for his win condition. - *Player B* had a slower development, as is customary for a control deck, and used his turns to ramp his mana and cast his commander. The commander choice here is notable as it represents the *card advantage* he will attempt to establish throughout the game (12:42 in the video [3]). - *Player C* spent his early game interacting (stopping *Player A's* multiple attacks) and casting a [card](Mystic Remora). - *Player D* had a slow start and maintained the burden of interaction on *Player B* and *Player C*, as he were last on priority (this can be seen by *Player D's* starting hand at 2:13 [3]). *Board state:*          A: [card](Noble Hierarch) and 1 mana.          B: [card](Birds of Paradise), [card](Vial Smasher the Fierce) and 3 mana.          C: [card](Mystic Remora) and 0 mana.          D: [card](Sensei's Divining Top) and 1 mana. *In this case, it's worth mentioning the previous moves:*          A: Resolved two tutors, had a tutor canceled, cast a [card](Silence) and was unable to win the game after a bounce spell on [card](Noble Hierarch).          B: Cast an acceleration piece and the commander, which was tapped before *Player A's* third turn.          C: Cast a [card](Mystic Remora) and only interacted with *Player A.*          D: Cast a [card](Sensei's Divining Top) but had no acceleration pieces or card advantage. This play didn't directly affect the end of the game, but it would have changed the course of the game if it had been different. *Player B* casts a [card](Keen Sense), trying to establish a card advantage engine. *Player D* casts a [card](Swords to Plowshares) on [card](Vial Smasher the Fierce), trying to prevent *Player B* from developing. The discussion between the players follows (it can be heard at 12:42[3]): D: I'll cast a Swords to Plowshares, targeting Vial Smasher. B: Please, reconsider. Luke (A) probably has a Food Chain in his hand. Are you sure you want to do that? D: Yeah. You still have 3 mana. Cameron (C) has 10 cards and is not that fast a deck. Slow decks win by baiting foolhardy like me into not let them use his engines early and bridging it to the late game. I've lost to Cameron on Tasigur enough to know that, yes, you do, in fact, kick the control player in the first couple turns, otherwise you lose. B: You are playing a dangerous game. D: Aha. If I lose to Luke (A), I lose to Luke (A). I can still just lose to you because you have a Keen Sense. I'm not winning in neither of those cases. I don't care who I lose to, I'd rather win. B: There is a good chance that you might not win because of it. D: There is a good chance that you should be saving your 3 mana for a counterspell then. B: What if I don't? D: Well, then. That's your punt, not mine. - *Analysis:* *Player D's* reasoning was proven correct, given the outcome of the game. It is interesting to note that *Player B* was forced to spend resources to establish a way to unite his early game with his late game. *Player B* also acted correctly, as he needed to ensure that his game plan would be executed, even in the presence of *Player A's* threat. Overall, great assessment made by *Player D* on the positions of each player in the match. Further reading (spoiler) and a centralized PDF (in Portuguese): https://github.com/kaylani2/cedh-ta *REFERENCES* [1] L. Maniacs, “S3 episode 1: Gitrog combo vs tasigur control vs chain veil teferi vs shimmer zur cedh gameplay.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5Dlbw0suXo, 2019. [2] L. Maniacs, “S3 episode 2: Breya consult vs shuffle hulk vs divergent control vs niv-mizzet parun cedh gameplay.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xwk0jZIijYI, 2019. [3] L. Maniacs, “S3 uncut: Food chain tazri vs 4 color rashmi vs inalla wizards vs e man cedh gameplay.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hz-hXKlSnxQ, 2019.

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Arinaldo

Creature types in Magic - Faerie lore


Hey, guys! o/ This is Ari and today I will continue this series about creature types featured in Magic. Today I will talk about *faeries*. Fairies are present in several tales we know, and also present in the folklore and mythology of some countries. The word *fairy* originated from the Latin word "fatum", which means *destiny*. This is due to the stories and popular tales where the fairies rule the destiny of men with their magic wands. In Magic, we use the archaic spelling, *faerie*. These creatures are usually represented with a light and small appearance, on top of having wings. They are only a foot tall (sometimes, even smaller) and are known to have a *taste for mischief*. Although they generally use their small forms and illusion spells to get rid of their enemies, they can still fight extraordinarily well when needed. The first faeries that appeared in Magic were associated with the *green* color and varied in appearance. [card](Scryb Sprites) was the first card to bear this type and was introduced in the Alpha edition. [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/lea-limited-edition-alpha-scryb-sprites-215.jpg) Still representing the green color, [card](Faerie Noble) was the first lord of the faeries, launched in 1995 in the *Homelands* expansion. [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/me3-masters-edition-iii-faerie-noble-117.jpg) Eventually, *Noble* and *Pixie-Queen* subtypes were incorporated into the *Faerie* type (although this is no longer true for Noble). The *Ouphe* subtype is used instead when we're talking about creatures that aren't small and do not have wings. For instance, [card](Shelkin Brownie) used to be a Faerie, while [card](Fyndhorn Brownie) used to be Brownie, and now both are considered *Ouphes*. Nowadays, faeries are represented mainly by the *blue* and *black* colors. More recently, though, *Throne of Eldraine* introduced us to *white* faeries. But before we talk about that, let's get to know a little more about faeries in the other planes of the *Multiverse*. In *Dominaria* we have [card](Fire Sprites), who are faeries that are able to cast fire spells, as well as being enveloped in a fire aura. It is unknown from which plane came the legendary faerie *Rubinia Soulsinger*, but her great ability to influence others to join her cause needs no introduction, as even the most powerful warrior readily surrenders to her. [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/cma-commander-anthology-rubinia-soulsinger-191.jpg) Faeries from the plane of *Ravnica* are known for their malicious pranks and the inhabitants of the plane have become accustomed to their antics. There, they are also famous for *hunting trolls*. [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/rtr-return-to-ravnica-faerie-impostor-39.jpg) In *Alara*, faeries were found most often in the *Esper shard*. These faeries had metallic wings and feet similar to their hands, which make them excellent mechanists. [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/ddf-duel-decks:-elspeth-vs-tezzeret-faerie-mechanist-54.jpg) So far, the most relevant plane for this type had been *Lorwyn*, which was introduced to us way back in 2007. Faeries are everywhere in *Lorwyn*. Like bees collecting pollen, they are capricious, malicious, and often seen as a nuisance for most of the races in this plane. Their antics are generally harmless, but always irritating and embarrassing. Their lives are extremely short, but they live them to the fullest, constantly looking for new tricks to alleviate their boredom. The faeries of this plane live in small groups called *cliques*. The notorious *Vendilion Clique* is formed by siblings *Veesa, Endry and Iliona*. Iliona is slightly older, and also their leader. [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/mor-morningtide-vendilion-clique-55.jpg) Although these little creatures seem to be unpredictable, they obey their queen's wishes. They are instructed to invade and steal dreams for the benefit of *Oona, Queen of the Fae*. It is said that Oona's magic is responsible for keeping Lorwyn in *eternal midsummer*. All the faeries on the plane originated from her. The queen and mother of the fae lives in isolation and sees the world through the *dreams* that her faeries bring her. Oona was one of the few creatures capable of maintaining her memories even after the *Great Aurora*. [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/shm-shadowmoor-oona-queen-of-the-fae-172.jpg) The Great Aurora was an event that transformed Lorwyn's plan into *Shadowmoor*, a dark and distorted version of the old plane. In Shadowmoor, faeries were the only race that did not undergo changes in their characteristics. By keeping her memory, Oona became even more powerful. As an honorable mention (still in the plane of Lorwyn), there is a legendary faerie called *Wydwen the Biting Gale*. Wydwen is mysterious, comes and goes as she wishes and does not live in cliques like other faeries. Much about her is still unknown, as she is not mentioned in any Lorwyn book. [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/lrw-lorwyn-wydwen-the-biting-gale-253.jpg) We just lived an adventure in *Eldraine*, a historic land of castles and magic, filled with treacherous faeries. But, just like the dishonest creatures and attractive spells that hide in the shadows, this world is not all that it seems. Most of Eldraine's faeries are opposed to the five courts, but there are beneficial faeries on that plane (a rare sight, huh?). [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/uploads/1569803288.png) *Mark Rosewater* (head designer for MtG) believes Eldraine has the first beneficial Faeries of Magic. *Throne of Eldraine* also introduced decks designed for the *Brawl* format. There are 4 decks, and lovers of the faerie type can pick the *Faerie Schemes* deck, led by [card](Alela, Artful Provocateur). [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/uploads/1569803360.jpg) [deck](15631) Eldraine also introduces us to *Oko*, a shapeshifter Planeswalker who appears to be both charismatic and presumptuous, a mysterious, intelligent and conceited figure. [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/uploads/1569803426.jpg) According to *Nic Kelman*, who is one of the writers responsible for bringing these characters to life, Oko came from a plane ruled by faeries who believed in a unified society. This ruling class of faeries decided that, for the greater good, their beloved pranks should be suppressed in order to create a perfect society - but for Oko, who was born with incredible shapeshifting skills, this new culture was against everything he believed in, and calling himself a speaker of truth, Oko opposed all this hypocrisy. However, he ended up being subjected to magical procedures to suppress his powers, but these procedures only succeeded in *igniting his spark*. We can imagine that it was a terrible experience for him and that it would make it almost impossible for him to trust someone again - especially those in positions of authority. And so, speaking of positions of authority, we can already imagine that Oko would not be at ease in Eldraine, and to disrupt the peace of the courts, Oko planned to eliminate the *High King* himself. That's all for today, and if you want to know more about the history of Eldraine, consider buying the official e-book: *Throne of Eldraine: The Wildered Quest*. I hope you enjoyed this article!! Let's talk more about faeries in the comments? You can also leave your suggestions for which type I should cover next! Thank you very much for reading and until the next time!

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Arinaldo

Analista de Sistemas em São Paulo. Jogador e produtor de conteúdo sobre MTG. Criador e apresentador do Canal e Podcast Mana Delver. Apesar de ser apaixonado pelo Pauper, também joga e aprecia todos os outros formatos.

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