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Thiago

How to start in cEDH - Edric, Spymaster of Trest

A Commander Deck with a simple but very functional idea to get you started in this competitive format.

Hello my dears! All right with you? My name is Fogaça and I'm here again to talk about Commander. I've been posting articles for some time now, and recently I came across a situation I hadn't thought before: a player from my community would like to come from Pauper to Commander, but I didn't know how. Then I told him to do something he liked, but there was a problem with that. He didn't have much time in the game, had no concept of advanced rules, it was hard to encourage him to use a complex deck and a unique archetype for Commander, except that his financial level would not allow him to put together a list he didn't like. This led me to conclude that some specific generals are ideal for beginning in the format so as to form something consistent and not difficult to assemble. Today, therefore, we will talk about one of these chosen ones, which I find particularly genuine to the theme - [card](Edric, Spymaster of Trest). [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/c16-commander-2016-edric-spymaster-of-trest-195.jpg) *INTRODUCTION* In this build, we'll use Edric's buying mechanics to make the deck run, so you need to know when to use your triggers, and be aware that they are optional, not overdecking. One should also be aware that I will explain the game plan in a linear way, that is, starting with the first turns of the game and continuing as the game progresses. *DECK CONSTRUCTION* Since we already know that the deck's main draw source will be our commander, he should be on the table as soon as possible, which will also prevent our beloved rogue from being overruled. We have low cost mana stones and classic dorks to help us gives consistency to our strategy. Once the Master Spy is on the table, we can abuse low-cost creatures and evasions such as Flying and others that allow their damage to be dealt to our opponents so that we draw several cards each turn. The more cards we draw, the greater the chance of obtaining an extra turn spell, then playing it and then having a new chance to deal combat damage. There will come a time when there will be no cards in our library, and when that happens, [card](Nexus of Destiny) will sparkle with its shuffle mechanics, allowing successive turns even after buying more than 100 cards to avoid the dreaded defeat by deck over. Subsequent stages of combat will lead us to victory. It is important that our extra turns are low cost so that you can play them as soon as we buy them. If we let the table run again, there is a great possibility that we will suffer from global removals and other evils that break our gameplan. For this reason, too, we have an extremely lightweight build that is sustained even though we have to respond to opponents, promote our own game and continue infesting the field with creatures that cannot be blocked. [deck](12606) *HIGH CARD REPLACEMENT* I tried to build the list without too many absurd value cards, but one or the other always ends up in the final version. The land we use has the function of casting the commander in turn two (as well as mana stones), but these can give way to something cheaper as long as it doesn't enters tapped. The chosen counters spells are not costly except for [card](Force of Will), which can be replaced by any other spell with this function - as long as the CMC of the chosen card is no greater than two. We can also change [card](Snapcaster Mage) by [card](Mission Briefing). *WHERE TO START?* We can really start off by making a low cost, evasive card pool, plus extra shifts and dorks. Once we have all of these, we will give priority to speeding up and protecting our game, in addition to the cards that complement and protect our strategy. *CONCLUSION* After presenting the facts and explaining how the strategy works we can conclude that there is no need to cling to the "Old Monkeys" to get started with the cEDH. A deck can be simple and competitive, just think of one way to do this task efficiently. For today we stay here. Thanks to everyone who has been following this series of articles and I ask you always leave your feedback to keep improving. Until next time, my dears!

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Arinaldo

Snow Goblin Aristocrats in Pauper


Hey guys o/ Here's Ari and in today's article we will have a look at a Rogue deck of the Pauper format: The Goblin Aristocrats. I recently featured on the [link](https://youtube.com/manadelver)(Mana Delver youtube channel) a deck tech from a player called [link](https://www.mtggoldfish.com/player/aokis)(aokis) that made 5-0 in an MTGO league. [deck](13131) My goal is to talk about the changes I've made to this list to suit my playing style, but first, as I try to write articles for all levels of players, I'd like to comment on the name of the deck. We usually classify as Aristocrats the decks that use creature sacrifice as their main strategy to generate value and win their games. This nomenclature started at the time of the Innistrad Standard with the cards [card](Falkenrath Aristocrat) and [card](Cartel Aristocrat). Since then several decks have appeared, in various formats, named Aristocrats. In Pauper we have Golgari Aristocrats which is a well known deck in the format, but the fact that it has no card that makes mention of the name Aristocrats can confuse anyone who does not know the origin of the nomenclature. [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/dka-dark-ascension-falkenrath-aristocrat-138.jpg) [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/gtc-gatecrash-cartel-aristocrat-150.jpg) *The art of playing with rogues decks* Do you know that urge to play with a rogue deck? I confess I had not felt for a long time, but the Goblin Aristocrats aroused this dormant feeling. I was always interested in playing with decks created around less popular cards. Putting my deck building in action, doing a lot of testing and keeping track of changes, winning consolidated format decks, and getting positive feedback from other players are some of the motivations that make me enjoy playing with these less competitive decks. At Pauper, I've played a lot with Rakdos Madness, [link](https://cardsrealm.com/metagame/pauper/suicide-black)(Suicide Black), Eggs ... They didn't bring me great results, but they certainly all bring back memories of the good times I had at MTG. For those who do not know the deck, in short the Goblin Aristocrats uses various goblins that through cards like [card](Goblin Chirurgeon) and [card](Goblin Sleeder) can be sacrificed to interact with other cards on the deck like [card](Mortician Beetle) and [card](Falkenrath Noble). [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/me1-masters-edition-goblin-chirurgeon-94.jpg) [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/c17-commander-2017-falkenrath-noble-113.jpg) * The Pauper Winter * Pauper is currently experiencing a time when many decks are using [card](Arcum's Astrolabe) to correct the base mana and break attempt to explore the card with some other interaction. Dissatisfied with some parts of the deck, and suffering mainly from the mana base, I decided to follow the format trend and appeal to the snowy mana base. The [link](https://www.mtggoldfish.com/player/aokis)(aokis) list uses 22 lands, and a considerable portion of them enters tapped. Although the deck is midrange, I came across a number of situations where the fact that having lands entering tapped turned in a huge disadvantage. I am currently playing with the following snowy list: [deck](13052) * Mana Base * Using [card](Arcum's Astrolabe), you can decrease the number of lands from 22 to 19. [card](Ash Barrens) and [card](Evolving Wilds): They are important for fetching the snowy lands. I'm a fan of Ash Barrens, but I don't use 4 just to lower the chance of coming with 2 in the starting hand. [card](Great Furnace) and [card](Vault of Whispers) are on the deck to interact with [card](Kuldotha Rebirth) and [card](Krark-Clan Shaman). You can increase the number of artifact lands and use [card](Galvanic Blast) instead of [card](Lightning Bolt). Testing is required to ensure that we will not miss snowy lands to cast the Astrolabe early in the game. *Artifacts* The original list used only 6 artifacts (4 lands and 2 [card](Sylvok Lifestaff)). I chose to use more artifacts, precisely because of [card](Kuldotha Rebirth) and [card](Krark-Clan Shamman). The snowy list uses twice as many artifacts and we still have the option to use more artifacts lands as mentioned above. About the artifacts, I see the possibility of making some changes like decreasing 1 [card](Prophetic Prism) and increasing 1 [card](Ichor Wellspring) or maybe back with 1 copy of [card](Sylvok Lifestaff) to main deck, since I realized that the deck has a tricky match against Burn. *Removals* Although [card](Terminate) is one of Pauper's best removals, I chose to use 2x [card](Goblin Grenade), it couldn't be any different, the deck has a lot of synergy with the card and its damage can be maximized if it has one or more [card](Falkenrath Noble) in the field. The [card](Lightning Bolt) is important for removing an opponent's key creature or dealing with an [card](Ephemerate). It is versatile and ultimately can end the game. Galvanic Blast would be an improvement, but the function would remain the same. [card](Sparksmith) as well as [card](Warren Weirding) (side) are our tutorable removals. I like Sparksmith because depending on the situation it is interesting to control your opponent's table and deal a lot of damage using our 1/1 goblin cards. Not to mention that sometimes the opponent spends all his removals on Sparksmith and is unresponsive to our other threats. *Creatures* Although we play with a lot of "insignificant" goblin tokens, the deck has creatures that are only good in isolation but very strong when they are together on the battlefield. The [card](Goblin Chirurgeon) gives a lot of consistency to our deck. It makes life very difficult for our opponent who will suffer to remove our main threats, [card](Mortician Beetle) and [card](Falkenrath Noble), if the surgeon is in the field. Regenerating any of these creatures means that in addition to keeping them alive, you still have trigged their abilities. Important reminder: You can only regenerate a creature that would be destroyed. But not if it is sacrificed or given -1 / -1 markers, ok? The [card](Goblin Sleeder) is on the deck along with the Surgeon and the [card](Krark-Clan Shaman) (side) to enable the sacrifice of our creatures. If the opponent happens to have no blockers for the [card](Falkenrath Noble) or [card](Mortician Beetle), this is the perfect situation to maximize turn damage with the [card](Goblin Sleeder). It is also useful for our creatures to stay alive during combat exchanges. [card](Goblin Matron) is very important on the deck, I don't have much to say about the card, only that I use 4 copies, because I always want to have it in hand to get the goblin I need according to the situation of the game. [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/en/som-scars-of-mirrodin-kuldotha-rebirth-96.jpg) And to wrap up the article, [card](Kuldotha Rebirth) went very well on the deck giving more meaning to the use of the Astrolabe and fueling our sacrifices. It's always important to keep the table full of goblins. And the post-side [card](Kuldotha Rebirth) proved to be a great way to recover from a mass removal. Lastly, had experienced some situations that I had many goblins on the battlefield I am considering using 1 copy of [card](Goblin Bushwhacker) to be tutored by Matrona in these situations.

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Arinaldo

Analista de Sistemas em São Paulo. Jogador e produtor de conteúdo sobre MTG. Criador e apresentador do Canal e Podcast Mana Delver. Apesar de ser apaixonado pelo Pauper, também joga e aprecia todos os outros formatos.

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