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Cube Pauper - a simple, cheap and fun draft

This article has the objective of encouraging players to get to know Cube Pauper, which is an affordable Draft.

Hello friends! Today we'll talk about a format which may please players who enjoy Pauper and Limited, especially those who like Draft, and which may catch the eye even of those who don't play either of them, because it is a very fun and diverse format. Cube Draft is a limited format in which, generally, the best cards in Magic see play. Boosters are created from a pool of cards and the participants take turns choosing the cards, like a normal Draft. However, Cube allows for more freedom, as players may build their own Cube and, considering that, we can build a Cube using just common cards. And, of course, we can use Pauper Staples and also add cards which don't usually see competitive play. While building we have to be careful not to create an unbalanced Cube. The interesting thing is to add cards with synergy with one another and which may find answers within their own Cube. As it may be complicated to build a list from scratch, below you will find lists separated by color, artifacts, multicolored and lands, and these are updated lists, to make it easier for you. It's important to notice that when new cards are released, some may be replaced on these lists. *WHITE* [deck](55800) *BLUE* [deck](55801) *BLACK* [deck](55803) *RED* [deck](55804) *GREEN* [deck](55805) *COLORED* [deck](55806) *UNCOLORED* [deck](55807) *ARTIFACTS* [deck](55808) *LANDS* [deck](55809) [center]{Playing with the cube} You build the shuffled Cube previously and then separate 15 cards semi-randomly, trying to include at least one nonbasic land in each booster. Then, each participant receives 3 boosters (you don't need to seal them - just give them the 15 card pile), which represents 45 cards for each player. From there, it works like a normal Draft. Players take turn in choosing cards, passing their boosters and receiving new ones from the other players. A part of drafting is the strategy of trying not only to pick good cards for your deck, but also to think about which cards your opponents are choosing and how you may thwart their plans, like choosing a card which the next player would probably pick. When you are finished with these picks, you will have 45 available cards to build your deck. [center]{Building the decks} Many players already have their own deckbuilding techniques for limited play. However, if you need some tips to get started, here are they: 1. Look for removals, of any cost, because they will be essential when dealing with the opponent's threats. 2. Seek cards which offer card advantage, as drawing may make a difference during the endgame. 3. Try to build a deck on a mana curve. At least for the first turns, try to find creatures that cost 1 and 2 (at least 8 creatures on this combination). If that isn't possible, add another type of permanent on this curve, but one that is still useful to your game plan. 4. Have at least 2 bombs. Bombs are cards which may win the game quickly, or assist you in ending it. Generally, these are 4/4 or 5/5 creatures. 5. Use 16 or 17 lands in your deck. As it will contain 40 cards, you will have 23 or 24 slots left to develop your strategy. 6. The minimum limit of cards in a Limited Deck is 40. Try not to go over this limit, as more cards may make it harder for the right cards to be draw. 7. Choose two colors, if possible. You will hardly build a monocolored deck, so two colors may be the most viable option. You may even add a third color to use one or two valuable cards in your deck, but if you exaggerate, you may end up not being able to access the right mana colors when you need them. 8. Know the cards of the Cube. It may assist you to think about what you will be playing against and also assist you to plan your objectives during your draft picks. An important detail: All cards you have selected during the draft process and that weren't used in your main deck may be used as sideboard. [center]{Calculating mana/lands} There is a way to calculate the amount of lands of each color the player will need to use in his/her deck efficiently. For that, some steps need to be follow. Below each step, we'll give an example of a fictional deck we'll be building, with the intention of making the process easier to understand. Step 1: Choose the number of lands, usually 16 or 17. This includes nonbasic lands. Example: 17. We'll add 1 Desert, so we'll need 16 more lands. Step 2: Count the mana symbols of your spells and note the number separately for each color. Example: Black: 6; Green: 8; Red: 7; Total: 21. To calculate the cost percentage of each color, we'll use a simple cross-multiplication: Mana Color: MC Total Cost: TC Percentage: P Formula: MC X P = X ÷ TC = Mana Percentage Black: 6x100=600, 600 ÷ 21 = 28,6% Green: 8x100=800, 800 ÷ 21 = 38,1% Red: 7x100, 700 ÷ 21 = 33,3% Now that we know the mana percentage of each color, let's find the approximate number of lands for each color. Mana Percentage: MP Total Lands: T (16) Total Percentage: 100 Formula: MP X T = X, X ÷ 100 = Total amount of lands of the desired color. Swamp: 28,6 x 16 = 457,6. 457,6 ÷ 100 = 4,6 approximately. Forest: 38,1 X 16 = 609,6. 609,6 ÷ 100 = 6,1 approximately. Mountain: 33,3 x 16 = 532,8. 532,8 ÷ 100 = 5,3 approximately. In conclusion, we'll have 5 swamps, 6 forests and 5 mountains. Here's our final list: [deck](55810) [center]{Conclusion} I hope this article has been both informative and suggestive, to the point of encouraging you to build your own cube, call your friends, and play. That's it for today. I thank Cards Realm for the support and trust. I also thank Vipermats Custom Mats. Create an account in Cards Realm using your Google or Facebook account and ask on the comments section for their 10% coupon code in any custom mat. Thank you for reading and until the next article!

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Who's who in Magic's business market?


[center]{INTRODUCTION} Many people have already asked us about who are our competitors. A constant doubt from our new partners is if they are allowed to comment about "store XX" or the "website YY". We never saw any problems with that, which causes surprise at first glance. This question is so recurrent that we have decided to explain our vision about Magic's market and how it may be segmented. This segmentation allows for a heterogeneous market to be seen as something homogeneous. For that, each element will be organized into groups. Every segmentation has its problem, considering the amount of information lost, but this is compensated with a diversity of benefits. Here we will see stores, websites and other elements being organized into categories, simplifying them, all through Cards Realm's field of view, with the objective of clarifying the general objectives of each one, their competitors and how they act. [center]{THE SUGGESTED SEGMENTATION MODEL} In our vision, Magic's market may be divided into 4 large groups: Wizards of the Coast, stores, marketplaces and referrers. All of them surround the players of the game, but also interact between themselves in order to reach their objectives. [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/uploads/1600631868.jpeg) *WIZARDS OF THE COAST* Wizards of the Coast is the company which possess the image copyrights of Magic: the Gathering. It acts as a regulator agent: It may create new products, ban cards, stop the selling flow of a product and even remove sites connected to Magic any moment it wishes to. The main objective of Wizards of the Coast is to sell products connected to the game. Its main clients, considering tabletop Magic, are the stores which sell their products to the final consumer. *STORES* Stores are the sellers of products licensed by Wizards of the Coast. They may be physical stores with workers and official retailer registration or they may simply be players selling their cards and products they obtained through tournaments. The main objective of a store is to sell their products. Their main clients are, thus, those who buy their products, which are mainly people who play tabletop Magic. To become relevant, stores usually seek entrance to selling platforms like Google Shopping; whichever helps them to increase their reach. To sell their products, stores purchase services which allow for stock administration, website creation and others. There are many stores, like [link](https://www.cardkingdom.com/)(Cardkingdom), sponsor of Cards Realm. Stores are closer to the players, including physical contact. Due to this characteristic, they also seek to maintain this unique proximity by organizing IRL events and tournaments, always trying to stay relevant on the life of their players. Online competition between stores is huge, but that is far tinier in physical stores. There aren't a lot of stores Wizards Play Network (WPN) worldwide, approximately around 1 store for each million people. *MARKETPLACE* Marketplaces are platforms or websites which provide services to stores. These services are usually stock administration, e-commerce platforms and website creation. The main objective of a marketplace is to convince stores to use their product. Thus, their main clients are the store owners. To keep themselves relevant, they create Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) so others may refer to them. The largest marketplaces in the world are: [link](https://www.amazon.com.br/)(Amazon), [link](https://www.shopify.com.br/)(Shopify), [link](https://www.ebay.com/)(Ebay), [link](https://www.cardmarket.com/en)(Cardmarket) and [link](https://www.tcgplayer.com/)(TCG Player). The biggest advantage of a marketplace is to make it cheaper to manage a store. So, instead of a single store having many teams like designers, programmers, management and others, the store may simply hire the services provided by a marketplace, which ends up being cheaper. The disadvantage is that marketplaces may be limited when allowing stores to build a custom setup to differentiate themselves in relation to others using the same service. However, marketplaces usually sell some customizable options. Marketplaces make profit by charging a monthly fee for the use of their services and a percentage of the sales. These are the two main sources of profit for marketplaces and, thus, they compete amongst themselves to attract more stores by offering better services to them. *REFERRERS* The referrers are all of those who create content, like articles, podcasts, videos, vlogs, streams, etc. The main client of a referrer is anyone who is interested in his/her content. Their main objective is to become relevant on the community and, through this, achieve the maximum possible number of interested people. The more relevant, the more they can sell space in their content to stores, marketplaces or even directly to Wizards of the Coast. Their main source of profit is obtained by referring people to their sponsors. Notice that a referrer is a free entity, referring whoever he/she desires. This freedom is their main advantage and the core of what is a referrer. Their profit is limited as they are dependent on the profit of others. In other words, they receive a very small percentage of each sale. As referrers we have YouTubers, Podcasters, Facebook pages, Magic eSports teams, etc. But we also have blogs like [link](https://www.hipstersofthecoast.com/)(Hipsters of The Coast); sites like our own Cards Realm or [link](https://www.mtggoldfish.com/)(MTGGoldFish); sites with price aggregators like Google Shopping too etc. As Cards Realm identifies itself as a referrer, we see no problems in mentioning other websites or YouTubers even if they are technically "competitors". A player may read the same news on two different websites (which is a positive thing) and, thus, contrary to stores and marketplaces where there is only one sale possibility for each client, the competition between referrers doesn't happen like this. There is competition, but it is subtle. [image](https://cdn.cardsrealm.com/images/cartas/crop/eld-throne-of-eldraine/happily-ever-after-16-med.jpeg?8987) [center]{QUESTIONS WHEN IDENTIFYING THE SEGMENTATION} The simplification when dividing the market in 4 parts may cause confusion when classifying an agent. It is important to verify how each agent behaves and their objectives. Let's analyze some questions which were raised during this segmentation process. *A store like [link](https://www.cardkingdom.com/)(CardKingdom), which has its own website system, may be considered a marketplace?* Cardkingdom's objective when developing their own site and sale system was to differentiate itself from the sea of stores that exists, not to sell their system to other stores. This objective is the same than a store and, for that, Cardkingdom is considered a store, not a marketplace. *A store's YouTube channel is considered a referrer?* The main objective of a YouTube channel created by a store is to sell their products. The freedom of a referrer doesn't exist in this case. Thus, the channel isn't considered a referrer. *A marketplace like [link](https://www.cardmarket.com/en)(CardMarket) which presents many stores is a referrer?* A product like the list of prices by a marketplace website like [link](https://www.cardmarket.com/en)(CardMarket) intends to find clients for the stores who are part of it. It is an attractive to those who may use Card Market's platform, thus increasing the number of participant stores. Notice that the objective isn't to show the best price for the player, as the best price may be on another website, like eBay or [link](https://www.tcgplayer.com/)(TCG Player); thus, we see these lists as marketplaces. It is possible to notice that many business end up mixing services presented on this segmentation. A marketplace may present referrer's characteristics in some contexts, like publishing articles; while a store may have some features of a marketplace; and, finally, a referrer may try to sell products, thus looking like a store as well. This mix is generally not recommended, but it happens. The reason why it isn't recommended is because the objectives of each segmented part are different and don't converge. For instance, a referrer which has her/his own store may scare sponsors away or even his/her viewers as he loses the freedom of talking about other stores. Another example is a store which when using their resources to create its own website ends up raising the price of their product unnecessarily, selling less. A last example would be a marketplace which tries to also work as referrer, not focusing on the stores and possibly losing its main clients. [center]{CONCLUSION} Cards Realm is characterized as a referrer. Thus, there is no problem in mentioning "competitors" as we don't see other players like such. We hope to have answered your questions about Cards Realm's position and how we see Magic's market. If you have any suggestions or questions, we are waiting for your comments.

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Leon

Programador do site da Cards Realm. O Magic vai muito além das cartas. Somos pessoas, uma comunidade enorme.

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